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Server Summary

This page contains some basic information about my two servers: clio and thalia.

  1. IP Addresses Table
  2. Host Key Fingerprints
  3. Load Averages Plot
  4. Temperatures Plot
  5. Disk Usage Plot
  6. Firewall Denials Plots
  7. Firewall Denials Maps
  8. Firewall Denials "Country Of Origin" Table
  9. Network Plots
  10. Bandwidth Plot
  11. Hardware Information

§1 IP Addresses Table

This table is created using IPs provided by ipecho.net.

clio (download IP address log) thalia (download IP address log)

§2 Host Key Fingerprints

clio

thalia

§3 Load Averages Plot

You can click on the plot to enable mouse tracking. If you click on the legend you can toggle the visibility of the datasets.

§4 Temperatures Plot

You can click on the plot to enable mouse tracking. If you click on the legend you can toggle the visibility of the datasets.

§5 Disk Usage Plot

You can click on the plot to enable mouse tracking. If you click on the legend you can toggle the visibility of the datasets. The orange region shows the theoretic limit of clio's storage capacity and the red shows the same for thalia.

§6 Firewall Denials Plots

You can click on the plots to enable mouse tracking. If you click on the legend you can toggle the visibility of the datasets. Note the logarithmic axes.

This second plot probably requires some explanation. In purple I have plotted, as points, the number of denials in an hour on clio against the number of denials in the same hour on thalia to study if there is any correlation in the denial rate at a given time on the two servers. The purple line is the linear fit to the dataset and Pearson's correlation parameter is written in the top-right corner in purple too. As of February 2017 they appear to be un-correlated. Additionally, in red and blue, I have plotted the histograms of the denials on clio and thalia respectively. Finally, I have written some basic parameters on the plot, such as the mean and the median values, to demonstrate that eventhough the denial rates at a given time on clio and thalia are un-correlated their distributions are nonetheless broadly similar.

§7 Firewall Denials Maps

These maps are created using locations provided by freegeoip.net. Note the logarithmic axes.

Map of Firewall Denials for clio

Map of Firewall Denials for thalia

§8 Firewall Denials "Country Of Origin" Table

This table is created using locations provided by freegeoip.net.

clio (download "country of origin" log) thalia (download "country of origin" log)

§9 Network Plots

You can click on the plot to enable mouse tracking. In the first plot: green indicates full network access; orange is only local network access; and red is no network access at all.

§10 Bandwidth Plot

You can click on the plot to enable mouse tracking. As mentioned below, clio is the slave server therefore the rate of data creation is indicative of the bandwidth of the connection between clio and thalia (give or take compression). Note the logarithmic axes. As of July 2017, the modal value is 9.5 Mb/s which equates to 1.13 MiB/s: this results in 3.98 GiB/hour and 1 TiB is transferred in 10.7 days.

§11 Hardware Information

clio

She is the slave server, with the following hardware:

thalia

She is the master server, with the following hardware:

This page was last modified on 03/09/2017.

The Unfriendly Web

Map of total firewall denials on my servers

Update (September 2015)

This site has changed quite a lot since I bought the domain in November 2005 and first started hosting my own content. During that time the internet has evolved an awful lot; as I write this in 2015 it is almost unrecognisable to what it once was. Gone are the days of hosting your own photo albums from your holidays on your own website: now you create an album on Facebook to share with your friends and family. Got some special photos that you are particularly proud of? Then deviantART or Flickr are the places for you to showcase them. Found an interesting page and wish to share it with your friends? Twitter and Facebook will update them immediately wherever they are. Written some pieces of source code that you think other people might find useful? GitHub will version track and syntax highlight it in an instant.

Consequently, this site no longer has photo albums and panoramas taken from my travels: the special ones are in my deviantART gallery and the normal ones are on my private Facebook page. I don't have a WordPress blog at the minute so I will still keep my articles on fixing technological problems ("Releases" and "Tutorials") on here for archival - if they're useful to you then that's great. If I ever restart publishing code it'll be on my GitHub page.

I have learned a lot since I first started writing (non-public) web pages in 2002. As testimony, this site: does not set any cookies; barely has any JavaScript on it; and is no longer dynamically generated using PHP. Rather, it is completely static with updates propagated using make every midnight thanks to cron.

© 2002-2017 Thomas Guymer. See the Copyright Statement.